Archive for Heartbeat Trust Events

Dun Laoghaire Golf Club Charity Day in aid of The Heartbeat Trust

A massive thank you and congratulations to our friends at Dun Laoghaire Golf Club on their successful charity day in aid of The Heartbeat Trust on September 17th. Over 80 people participated in the  competitive tournament with each team challenging the captain in a “Beat the Captain” at a par 3 to hit the ball closer to the pin. The event was followed by a reception and auction in the clubhouse. In total a tremendous €33,000 was raised in aid of the Trust. All proceeds will help us continue to support and improve services to predict and treat heart failure. 

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The  support of the club is so much appreciated. Special thanks go to the committee Pat Durning (Chairman), John Traynor, Angela O’Sullivan, Jean Hennebry, Mary Rye, Alan Gormally and Una O’Grady. And to Club Captain Noel Mannion.

Noel said “As Captain of Dun Laoghaire Golf Club, I was delighted to nominate The Heartbeat Trust as my preferred charity for Captain’s Charity Day. It gives me great pleasure to present Prof. Ken McDonald with a cheque for €33,000 and I wish everybody in the Heart Beat Trust continued success with their outstanding work. Sincere thanks to all members of DLGC for their support on the day, to sponsors and all who made donations as well as all who supported the auction. Special thanks to a wonderful fundraising committee under the leadership of Pat Durning.

Prof McDonald, Clinical Director of the Trust said “Each year theTrust continues to advance our mission of preventing and caring for patients with heart failure. Through our programs we have seen many lives changed for the better. The Trust’s goal is to continue to make an impact on the prevention and treatment of heart failure and with the support of generous donations such as this we can continue to see advances in our research and services both locally and internationally.

Thank you to everyone who continues to generously supports the Trust. If you would like to host an event in aid of the Trust please contact Lisa at lisa@heartbeat-trust.org for further information. 
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Heartbeat Trust researcher wins Young Investigator Award at Irish Cardiac Society Conference

Dr Grace O'Carroll accepting the Brian Maurer Young Investigator Award from Dr. Albert McNeill, President of the Irish Cardiac Society

Dr Grace O’Carroll accepting the Brian Maurer Young Investigator Award from Dr. Albert McNeill, President of the Irish Cardiac Society

Dr Grace O’Carroll, an MD researcher at the Trust, was awarded the Brian Maurer Young Investigator Award at last week’s Irish Cardiac Society Annual Scientific Meeting held in Derry for her work on Subclinical diastolic dysfunction is prevalent in diabetes, progresses over time and may reflect a handicap in natriuretic peptide function.

Dr O’Carroll’s study showed that abnormalities in cardiac structure exist in a significant proportion of diabetic patients in the absence of cardiac symptoms and that this is associated with poorer cardiovascular outcomes in the long term.

The work presented at the Irish Cardiac Society Conference formed the basis of Dr O’Carroll’s MD thesis and was funded by the Health Research Board and the Trust.

Dr O’Carroll said “This study highlights the importance of an effective screening program for diabetic patients but also the potential difficulties with current cardiovascular biomarkers in predicting cardiovascular risk in this group”.

The Brian Maurer Young Investigator Award, is aimed at promising young investigators, to encourage and promote quality and original research in Cardiology. The award is named in honour of Dr. Brian Maurer who passed away in 2013. Dr Maurer, a cardiologist in St Vincent’s University Hospital until his retirement and a past Chairperson of the Trust, worked tirelessly to promote and further cardiology practice and research throughout his career. Dr O’Carroll has now taken up a post at Wexford General Hospital, we wish Grace every success in her future endeavours.

President of the ICS, Dr Albert McNeill is pictured with Dr. Grace O'Carroll. Former Heartbeat Trust colleague Dr Matthew Barrett is also pictured.

President of the ICS, Dr Albert McNeill is pictured with Dr. Grace O’Carroll. Former Heartbeat Trust colleague Dr Matthew Barrett is also pictured.

 

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Michael Lyster

  • Michael Lyster takes a break this week from commentating on the All Ireland finals to discuss another important September event, World Heart Day on Friday 29th90,0001 people in Ireland live with heart failure
  • Stand Up to Heart Failure aims to improve awareness of heart failure as an early diagnosis and treatment are key to ensuring people living with the condition can live longer, better lives

September 11th 2017, Dublin: September is synonymous with GAA and Croke Park, and the All-Ireland final weekends are marked in every fan’s calendar and anticipated all summer. Today Michael Lyster took a break from commentating on the finals to discuss another important September event, World Heart Day on Friday 29th. This September, the RTE Sunday Game presenter wants to encourage all of Ireland to unite and Stand Up to Heart Failure.

Heart Failure is a debilitating, life-threatening condition in which the heart cannot pump enough blood around the body because the muscle of the heart become too weak or too stiff to work properly2. However, with access to timely diagnosis, appropriate medical management and follow-up services, a patient’s prognosis can be significantly improved. It is estimated that 90,000 people live with the condition in Ireland1. Due to Ireland’s ageing population, heart failure is set to increase dramatically, leading to an increase in hospitalisations from heart failure of more than 50% over the next 25 years3.

Campaign ambassador Michael Lyster opened up about his own experience with heart failure at today’s launch: “Croke Park is one of the biggest stadiums in Europe, with an impressive match day capacity of 82,300. But if everyone in Ireland living with heart failure was invited to Croke Park for the All Ireland final, we would have to build an extra stand as there are 90,000 people living with this chronic condition, and they certainly wouldn’t be standing in the Hill for the duration of a 70-minute game.

For me, heart failure became apparent in the middle of my ‘busy’ season, championship time, and gradually I started feeling worse and worse. I had no energy, I was waking up in the middle of the night panting for breath. I couldn’t ignore it any longer; I went to the doctor and was diagnosed with heart failure.

It was important for me to get involved in this campaign as I understand how frustrating it can be for those living with heart failure, as it is often a forgotten condition. Heart failure is something you can manage on a day to day basis. Yes, you have to make sure you take your medication, watch what you eat and drink and get your exercise. But you can’t let it hold you back. I had to stand up to my condition, not let it impact my work or my life. I encourage everyone to familiarise themselves with the symptoms and risk factors, and to visit your doctor if you have concerns and to make sure you get the best treatment available.”

Stand Up to Heart Failure, a campaign supported by Croí, Heartbeat Trust, Irish Heart, and Novartis, aims to raise awareness of the red flag symptoms of heart failure. These symptoms include; fatigue; shortness of breath, especially with activity or lying flat; swollen feet or ankles. Common risk factors of heart failure to be aware of are; high blood pressure, previous heart attack(s), and diabetes. If you are concerned about heart failure, please speak to your doctor for more information.

Prof Ken McDonald, Clinical Director of Heartbeat Trust said; “At the Heartbeat Trust we are delighted to be part of the collective effort to raise awareness of this condition. The Heart Failure Toolkit is a wonderful online resource for anyone interested in learning more about the condition and I encourage those who are concerned to utilise it. The Heartbeat Trust is here to help all those living with heart failure in Ireland. Awareness of the condition, its symptoms and preventive measures is so important to ensure a long and healthy life.”

 

Please click here to access our heart failure toolkit.

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StopHF  - The Heartbead Trust

 

The Heartbeat Trust are delighted to launch our new STOPHF website www.stophf.ie.

The website is designed for STOPHF patients, health care professionals (HCPs) and anyone with an interest in the preventing not just heart failure but cardiovascular disease.

It is layered with multimedia content including our “Ask the Expert” video wall and photo gallery. The website features patient educational resources including our brand new STOPHF patient booklet, information on the STOPHF screening programme and a secure patient forum. On www.stophf.ie there is a wealth of information including tips and advice on exercise and physical fitness, healthy eating and lots, lots more.

“The clinical team at the Heartbeat Trust have worked closely with patients to develop this wonderful online resource. STOPHF.ie provides the most up to date information for patients, their families and healthcare professionals. We are extremely lucky to have secured a Health Research Board Knowledge Exchange and Dissemination award to support this work. This website together with our recent adoption into US guidelines means the STOPF and the Heartbeat Trust’s Predict, Protect, Prevent message can continue to spread.” Dr Ciara Keane, Director of Operations, the Heartbeat Trust.

The site will also act as a one stop shop for HCPs, loaded with info on STOPHF, such as how to get your clinic involved, CME case studies, info on types of blood tests available (NTproBNP & BNP), a secure forum and enabling registered users to log in directly to our Heart Failure Virtual Clinic meeting room.

“This new website will be an excellent resource for patients and healthcare professionals. Its straightforward and easy to use with lots of relevant information on how to stay heart healthy. We have designed the site to be accessible to older users and have an option to increase font size for visually impaired users. The site is visually pleasing and the use of content boxes makes for a better user experience.” Sinead Hand, Communications Officer with the Heartbeat Trust.

 

STOPHF Team Hospital

We hope you enjoy discovering our new website.

Stay Heart Healthy and visit  www.stophf.ie

Already, feedback from patients and HCPs has been extremely positive.

 

“May I congratulate you on a great piece of work. It is informative and easy to navigate. The information is available in easily absorbed and perused sections. I found the use of videos and links made it an interesting exploration and they will encourage me to return again to review the information. I have probably seen some of this advice before but it has certainly impacted more now and I look forward to putting some of it into effect – a small “road to Damascus” event?” – Tony Bergin

                “It (www.stophf.ie) is some achievement and the site looks great!” – Dr Patricia Campbell

“Looks great guys, very fresh!” – Croi Heart & Stroke Charity

                “Congrats The Heartbeat Trust on a great website! Packed with useful info!” – Tickerfit

 

 

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On the 15th June, The Heartbeat Trust held their first virtual STOPHF Patient information webcast. This education session was hosted live via YouTube and number of GP’s/patients nationwide were invited to view the webcast from the comfort of their own home/office.

Professor Ken McDonald, Consultant Cardiologist and Medical Director of the Heartbeat Trust along with Dr Mark Wilkinson presented an update on our ground-breaking STOPHF heart failure prevention study and discussed how results from the study have helped shape the expanding heart failure prevention service. Dr Mark Wilkinson, a registrar with the Trust gave an informative talk on how the heart works and what happens to your heart in heart failure. He also gave some excellent tips on making heart healthy lifestyle choices.

The trust received some extremely positive feedback from patients and healthcare professionals alike.  “Thank you all for an excellent presentation. So informative and easy to watch. I have not been able to attend previous meetings due to work commitments so, this evenings arrangements were great for me”. (STOPHF Patient)

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This was the first virtual patient focused educational webcast by the Trust and is potentially the innovative solution required to enhance patient engagement (the wonder drug of the 21st century). The Heartbeat Trust aim to produce a number of these webcasts as a means of offering a virtual solution to STOPHF patient education.

Guests were invited to simply click on the link to visit The Heartbeat Trust YouTube channel at the specified time and date. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAfEwrJ0aarrrQ_nSjXF25Q

This education webcast was recorded and is available to watch now on YouTube.

Please SUBSCRIBE to our channel to stay updated on future meetings.

Good for the Heart; The Heartbeat of Bloom

On Thursday 1st June, The Heartbeat Trust launched their ‘Good for the Heart’ garden at Bloom by Bord Bia, to the garden visitors and a host of VIP guests. The Garden titled ‘Good for the Heart’ was awarded Highly Commended by the Bloom Judges.

Pictured at the launch was President Michael D. Higgins and the President’s Wife Sabina Higgins, Micheál Martin (Fianna Fáil leader), Tony Ward (Former Irish Rugby Legend and an active supporter of the Trust) and Dr. Ambrose Mcloughlin (Heartbeat Trust Chairman) and our wonderful volunteers.

As one of The Heartbeat Trusts main focus areas is STOP-HF and the prevention of heart failure, the garden encompasses that message. ‘Good for the Heart’ is a Heart Healthy garden, rich in healthy vegetables and fruit to increase awareness and help in the fight against heart failure. The garden has fruit and veg areas representing the need for healthy diet, highlighting healthy foods that aid in heart health.

Bird feeders with various seeds and nuts represent the importance of lowering cholesterol. Hanging from our apple tree are wooden hearts made by our volunteers which represent the hearts saved by STOP-HF. In the garden is a moss covered chair ornate with blooming flowers to represent life and a bicycle to represent the importance of exercise and fitness.

‘Good for the Heart’ received a lot of positive feedback from the visitors which is not surprising as 1 in 5 people will be affected by heart failure. The garden really hit a chord with people and the messages within the garden were well received.
“Good for the Heart’ is a Heart Healthy garden, rich in healthy vegetables and fruit to increase awareness and help in the fight against heart failure. Heart failure can largely be avoided and with the correct supports can be significantly reduced. We all need to be heart aware and stay heart healthy!” Sinead Hand, Communications Officer, Heartbeat Trust.

Sinéad Hand designed the ‘Good for the Heart’ garden on behalf of the charity and a small but amazing team of volunteers helped create the suburb garden.
Mary Proctor from Lissenhall Nurseries is part of the small team behind Good for the Heart. She has expert knowledge of horticulture and has given incredible guidance with putting the garden together. Lissenhall Nurseries offer a full range of outdoor products, including fruit trees, plants and hedging.

The Heartbeat Trust would like to thank all our garden volunteers for their hard work. Without their support our ‘Good for the Heart’ garden would never have bloomed into fruition. Special thank you to Francis Hand, Nicholas Codd, Gus Keane, Adrienne O’ Connell Flood, Maura Quirke and Dolores Hand.

Tullys Nurseries are one of the main sponsors of the garden. They have given fantastic support to The Heartbeat Trust and supplied planting material for our postcard garden in Bloom.

The garden has been sponsored by a number of suppliers including Lissenhall Nurseries, Tullys Nurseries, Dunshane Nursery, Carl Foran Photography,  Green Worx, Bord na mona and Cuprinol.

The Heartbeat Trust would like to extend their thanks to everyone who has contributed to the garden.

The Heartbeat Trust Launch Education Programme for Secondary Schools

The Heartbeat Trust are proud to announce the launch an education outreach programme aimed at secondary level students. The aim of the education sessions are to encourage teenagers to be proactive and take control of their lifestyle and make heart healthy choices which aid in the prevention of heart failure.

Heart failure is often seen as an ‘old age’ issue however it is becoming more prominent in Irish society. Heart failure can largely be avoided and with the correct aids can be significantly reduced. We all need to be heart aware and stay heart healthy!

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The Education Programme was launched with students from St Tiernan’s Community School, Balally on  April 26th 2017.  Dr. Mark Wilkinson and Ms. Sinead Hand (from The Heartbeat Trust) presented to the students on the Science of Heart Failure followed by an interactive session.

The students were extremely enthusiastic about the education session and The Heartbeat Trust were delighted with the positive feedback.

“We are very excited about the launch of the Heartbeat Trust Educational Programme which ties in nicely with the Trust’s motto of Predict, Protect, Prevent. With this new initiative we aim to educate the younger generation in ways they can be proactive about their own health. We are delighted to be able to engage with the students and encourage them to make healthier lifestyle choices.” Sinead Hand, Communications Officer and School Liaison Coordinator.

The outreach programme run by the Heartbeat Trust charity aims to inspire teenagers to live healthier lives and guide them in their health education. The talks are free of charge and available to secondary school students. If you are interested in having the team visit your school in the next academic year please contact info@heartbeat-trust.org

About The Heartbeat Trust

The Heartbeat Trust, is Ireland’s national heart failure charity, established in 2004 by Prof Ken McDonald and Dr Mark Ledwidge to support specialist clinical and research services in heart failure and heart failure prevention. Patient services are provided in St Michael’s and St Vincent’s Hospitals. St Michael’s Hospital, Dun Laoghaire  is also home to the STOP-HF initiative – which offers screening to prevent heart failure, a service aimed at prevention and early detection.

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The STOPHF screening initiative is where individuals (over 40 years of age who have one cardiovascular risk factor such as high blood pressure or diabetes) have a simple blood test which can predict those at risk of not just heart failure but other cardiovascular diseases, allowing more focused care to be directed to these at individuals.  The programme began in 2004 as a research project with the main aim of assessing if people with risk factors for heart failure could have their risk defined by the use of a blood test known as Natriuretic Peptide (NP). NP is a protein that is released from the heart when it is under stress or strain.

Special thank you to all the students and staff at St Tiernan’s Community School, Balally.

Creative Panda for sponsoring our bookmarks.

Natasha’s Living Foods for sponsoring some delicious (healthy) treats!

STOPHF (Screening to Prevent Heart Failure) Information video Launch on European Heart Failure Awareness Day

On May 5th, European Heart Failure Awareness Day, The Heartbeat Trust are proud to launch the STOPHF (Screening to Prevent Heart Failure) information video. The video was created in order to demonstrate to the wider community that STOPHF is a simple blood test with incredible results.

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Nurse and patient STOPHF NP blood test

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The STOPHF screening initiative is where individuals (over 40 years of age who have one cardiovascular risk factor such as high blood pressure or diabetes) have a simple blood test which can predict those at risk of not just heart failure but other cardiovascular diseases, allowing more focused care to be directed to these at individuals.  The STOPHF programme began in 2004 as a research project with the main aim of assessing if people with risk factors for heart failure could have their risk defined by the use of a blood test known as Natriuretic Peptide (NP). NP is a protein that is released from the heart when it is under stress or strain.

The information video was created by a wonderful team of volunteers and The Heartbeat Trust  would like to thank Mrs. Dolores Hand (actress) and Mr. Cian Brennan (videographer) for their contributions.

About The Heartbeat Trust

The Heartbeat Trust, is Ireland’s national heart failure charity, established in 2004 by Prof Ken McDonald and Dr Mark Ledwidge to support specialist clinical and research services in heart failure and heart failure prevention. Patient services are provided in St Michael’s and St Vincent’s Hospitals. St Michael’s Hospital, Dun Laoghaire  is also home to the STOP-HF initiative – which offers screening to prevent heart failure, a service aimed at prevention and early detection.

Heart Failure the Facts

Did you know…? Heart Failure affects approximately 90,000 people in Ireland, costing upwards of €700 million. One in five of us will develop heart failure in our lifetimes. These figures are staggering and more is needed to help prevent this silent killer.

STOPHF Video links

Vimeo – https://vimeo.com/210938511

Youtube – https://youtu.be/lHHS6HAG_WI

Heart Failure Virtual Clinics

One in 5 of us will develop heart failure in our lifetime. There are up to 90,000 people in Ireland living with Heart Failure and the estimated cost of Heart Failure is €660 million.

Heart Failure, with the correct supports can largely be managed in the community. That’s where the Heartbeat Trust steps in with its innovative approach to health care management.

The Heartbeat Trust has been at the forefront of development of structured care programmes for the prevention and management of heart failure, including a “virtual consultation” service to enable specialists and GPs to discuss cases and reduce the need for outpatient department referral by 80%.

The Heart Failure Virtual Clinics (HFVC) are used to disseminate expert advice and education to GPs. Using a web conference platform GPs can log in remotely, following presentation of a short CME topic GPs can discuss their cases with Prof Ken McDonald, Consultant Cardiologist and Medical Director of the Heartbeat Trust, Dr Patricia Campbell, Consultant Cardiologist and their specialist team. The HFVCs provide online, real-time conversations between the GP and specialist allowing speedy focused interactions

The trust has developed an info-graphic highlighting the key benefits of the HFVC and includes a number of excellent quotes from GPs across the country.

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For GPs, the HFVC provides a dynamic learning environment, improved knowledge base, peer to peer support and most importantly the necessary supports to maintain and treat heart failure patients in the primary care setting.

By managing heart failure in the community, the HFVC removes a step in the traditional care pathway facilitating interaction between the specialist/GP. The HFVC care pathway is cost efficient and creates a dynamic, collaborative communication environment compared to the traditional referral letter pathway. This in turn reduces costs and the need for patient travel and family inconvenience.  Moreover, the HFVC reduces the need for Out Patient Department (OPD) referrals which frees up hospital OPD slots for those in need of standard clinics resulting in shorter waiting times and speedier reviews.

The Heartbeat Trust are passionate about the future advancement of eHealth in Ireland and are optimistic about the use of technology for wider dissemination of heart failure knowledge and community care.

How It Works.

The Heart Failure Virtual Clinic is service that has been successfully running for twenty-four months.  These virtual consultations are held bi-weekly from the Heartbeat Trust head office and are currently on Tuesdays and Fridays at 1pm., having recently expanded into the Carlow Kilkenny region through support from the HSE.

CME topics include (but are not limited to), Diagnosis of Heart Failure, Management of Stable Heart Failure, Troubleshooting medications in heart failure and other similar topics. Following the CME topic up to six cases are discussed which results in an intense hour of impartation of knowledge.

Patient referrals are accepted through email/FAX and Healthlink, via the Heart Failure Virtual Clinic Referral tab.

Presently, there are 150 GPs signed up to date across the East Coast, Midlands and now Carlow Kilkenny region with 100% of GPs agreeing that the HFVC advice was useful in treating their patients and that the patients themselves benefited as a result of their participation in the HFVC. The patients themselves were also happy to have their conditions discussed with expert and groups of GPs and relieved to not be referred to the OPD.

The Heartbeat Trust provide full training for first time users or those that require a refresher.

If you would like further information or to sign up to the HFVC please contact Lisa McCudden on 0877474436 or lisa@heartbeat-trust.org

 

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Barometer Info Graphic

Heart Failure Community Calls on Government to Prioritise ‘Forgotten’ Illness Which Will Affect 1 in 5 People in Ireland 

New report finds treatment of Heart Failure is no longer a lost cause and recommends a framework to improve lives of 90,000 affected by heart failure.

Heart Failure is a serious, but forgotten, chronic condition which carries a huge cost of €660 million per year to Irish society.  Heart Failure is the leading cause of hospitalisations in Ireland yet just 7% of people in Ireland can identify symptoms of Heart Failure.

Pictured at the launch are L to R Minister Sean Kyne, TD, Dr. Ambrose McLoughlin, Chairman Heartbeat Trust and Kevin O’ Reilly Chairman Croi, Heart & Stroke Charity.

Click here to read full report.

Monday 21st November, 2016: The treatment of Heart Failure, a ‘forgotten’ chronic condition, is no longer a lost cause, according to the authors of a new report entitled ‘Heart Failure Country Barometer: Ireland’. The report outlines four key policy priorities and calls on the Government to implement this framework to improve the lives of 90,000 people affected by Heart Failure6.

Minister of State for Gaeltacht Affairs and Natural Resources, Sean Kyne, TD officially launched, and contributed to, the report which, most importantly, provides solutions to this major health challenge which costs the state €660 million per year1. Heart Failure, a serious and often debilitating chronic condition, has a worse prognosis than many of the most common forms of cancer and can lead to poor quality of life for those affected4.

Speaking at the launch meeting, Minister Sean Kyne, TD said, “For too long Heart Failure has been the forgotten condition in health policy in Ireland, despite its impact on patients’ lives and the economy. Today, we have outlined the current situation in Ireland and highlighted the unmet needs of both the medical and patient Heart Failure community. The burden of Heart Failure will only increase in years to come so we must make Heart Failure a truly national priority now, and implement the recommendations put forward in this Barometer report.”

The ‘Heart Failure Country Barometer: Ireland’ report, developed by Croí, the Heartbeat Trust, and supported by Novartis, with contributions from medical professionals, patients and advocacy experts, highlights four key policies to prioritise and recommends how to achieve them:

  • Make Heart Failure a national priority: Explicitly mention Heart Failure within existing chronic disease policies and ensure there are sufficient resources to implement the HSE’s National Clinical Programme for Heart Failure on a national level, with adequate funding for both GP and hospital care.

 

  • Prioritise speedy diagnosis and treatment: Ensure that patients with symptoms of Heart Failure are diagnosed as early as possible, without delay.

 

  • Ensure consistent and coordinated patient care: Create a coordinated, community-based national programme between the hospital and community care at general practice level to provide patients greater continuity of care and encourage patient self-management.

 

  • Increase awareness and understanding of Heart Failure: Support a national Heart Failure prevention programme by raising public awareness of the risk of developing Heart Failure and ensuring access to high quality information and support for both the public and the medical profession.

Commenting on the report, Professor Ken McDonald, Consultant Cardiologist and National Clinical Lead for Heart Failure said, “Chronic illness threatens to overrun our healthcare system. Heart Failure, as the most complex of these illnesses, can be used as a pilot to establish effective methods of managing chronic diseases, primarily in the community, with the support of hospital-based specialists, when needed. A large number of premature deaths still occur as a result of lack of knowledge of Heart Failure and its symptoms. Better recognition would prompt people to seek treatment at an earlier stage, leading to more accurate diagnosis, decreased risk of hospitalisations and improved survival rates. Most types of Heart Failure are preventable, patients who are treated early can significantly improve their outcome. The policy asks we are calling for will improve the prevention, treatment and management of Heart Failure in Ireland.”

Neil Johnson, Chief Executive, Croí said, “This report brings together medical expertise, patient insights, advocacy experience and economic data to create a framework for our Government to improve the lives of those affected by Heart Failure in Ireland. The burden that Heart Failure can have on patients’ lives, and the State, needs to be improved as Heart Failure treatment is no longer a lost cause. We know what we need to do to protect 90,000 hearts in Ireland, and the additional 10,000 newly diagnosed each year. Now we must do it.”

In Europe, 15 million people live with Heart Failure. Currently there is no EU-wide strategy supporting public awareness, prevention, diagnosis and management of Heart Failure. Strong leadership by European and national policy makers is essential to reduce the future burden of the condition. In October, a new Written Declaration on Heart Failure was launched in the European parliament, in partnership with patients, professionals and parliamentarians. Irish MEPs Mairead McGuinness and Nessa Childers are supporting the Written Declaration on Heart Failure.

For more information, and to read the full framework of policy priorities, visit http://www.heartbeat-trust.ie / www.croi.ie / www.novartis.ie

and follow us on Twitter and Facebook #heartfailure #changeHFpolicy.