Archive for Heartbeat Trust Events – Page 2

World Heart Day

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For World Heart Day (29th September) The Heartbeat Trust team had a information stand in St. Vincent’s University Hospital and took photos of staff and patients holding their branded social media frame in an effort to raise awareness of heart health and heart failure prevention. These photos were then uploaded onto social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter, for fans to Like, Share and tag themselves in.

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To run alongside this event, the Heartbeat Trust ran a social media competition to assist in the growth of their online profile. The Happy Pear, kindly donated their cookbook ‘The World of the Happy Pear’ for a spot prize and the response was excellent.

Social media is an excellent way of driving communication and patient engagement which has become a key communication strategy for the Heartbeat Trust in promoting on-going fundraising activities and awareness campaigns.

An information meeting on the Screening to Prevent Heart Failure (STOP-HF) programme developed by Professor Kenneth McDonald, Consultant Cardiologist and Medical Director of the Heartbeat Trust was held in the Talbot Hotel, Stillorgan on the evening of Tuesday 11th October. The Heartbeat Trust, is a national charity that supports specialist clinical and research services in Heart Failure & Heart Failure Prevention by promoting efficiency in Irish healthcare especially around heart failure. Our motto is Predict, Protect, Prevent.

The Heartbeat Trust run a Screening initiative called STOP-HF (Screening to Prevent Heart Failure) in which individuals (over 40 years of age who have one cardiovascular risk factor, such as high blood pressure or diabetes) have a simple blood test which can predict those at risk of not just heart failure but other cardiovascular diseases, allowing more focused care to be directed to these at individuals.

The STOP-HF patient information meeting entitled, “Get More from STOP-HF; Equipping yourself with the knowledge to keep a Healthy Heart” was delivered by the expert team at The Heartbeat Trust. The speakers on the evening included Prof Ken McDonald, Consultant Cardiologist and Medical Director of the Heartbeat Trust, Fiona Ryan; Pharmacist, Elaine Tallon;STOP-HF Nurse and Karen Cradock; Specialist Cardiac Physiotherapist.

Over 300 guests attended this successful meeting and gained invaluable knowledge from these experts.

STOPHF Meeting

Pictured are attendees making a heart symbol with their hands in an effort to raise awareness of Heart Failure and Heart Failure Prevention.

Dr Ambrose McLoughlin, Chairman of the Heartbeat Trust and former Secretary General of the Department of Health, opened the meeting and welcomed over 300 guests.

Prof Ken McDonald gave the opening lecture on STOP-HF and the importance of BNP blood testing (BNP: B-type natriuretic peptide- which is a protein that is released from the heart muscle when it is under stress or strain) in preventing Heart Failure and the results to date. Ms Elaine Tallon, STOPHF Nurse followed with excellent advice on managing a balanced diet, cholesterol and blood pressure, followed by tips on exercise and how to reduce stress. With a phenomenal figure of 50% not taking medications as prescribed, Dr Fiona Ryan discussed the importance of medication adherence. She also explained clinical trials, how they work and the risks and benefits of participating.
The audience received an interactive presentation from Karen Cradock, Specialist Cardiac Physiotherapist, who (much to the guest’s amusement) had the audience out of their seats, doing gentle stretches and squats. Karen gave demonstrations of the types of exercise that should be undertaken on a daily basis in order to maintain a healthy heart.
The Heartbeat Trusts Communication Officer, Sinéad  Hand discussed the need for volunteers to get involved in the charity’s efforts in raising awareness of Heart Failure Prevention in Ireland. John, a Heartbeat Trust volunteer and STOPHF patient shared his experiences of the service and appealed to the guests to get involved with the charity in driving the future advancements of the STOPHF programme.

If you would like to get involved or find out any further information about The Heartbeat Trust, please get in touch by emailing us at info@heartbeat-trust.org

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eHealth in Revolution
Dublin Castle 15th-17th September

A major conference bringing together renowned speakers in healthcare and technology was held in Dublin Castle from the 15th-17th September. The conference was organised by the The Menarini Foundation and The Heartbeat Trust, a national charity that supports specialist clinical and research services in Heart Failure & Heart Failure Prevention and promotes efficiency in Irish healthcare especially around heart failure.

The eHealth in Revolution conference was officially opened by Minister for Health Simon Harris TD and over 250 local and international delegates attended this three-day event.

Speaking at the opening, Minister Harris said: “I want to recognise the importance of eHealth in delivery of patient care. It has the potential to place the patient at the heart of our health system, and that’s something I’m very keen to see. In particular, it can allow health professionals to provide care in the most appropriate setting. New technologies are allowing for different approaches to the treatment of patients, offering alternative models of integrated care that can contribute to better outcomes for patients. Modern technology and eHealth provides opportunities and facilities that enable patients to truly participate in and contribute to the management of their own health.”

Prof Ken McDonald, Consultant Cardiologist and Medical Director of The Heartbeat Trust, said: “This meeting presents an excellent opportunity to hear the latest information on many of the critical aspects of eHealth, along with insights into home-grown applications of this form of healthcare delivery. IT has the capacity to revolutionise healthcare delivery in Ireland. It is unfathomable why we haven’t made more progress with implementing technologies in healthcare but this conference offers a reflection point and an opportunity to spark a rising for eHealth.”

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Dr Ambrose McLoughlin, Chairman of the Heartbeat Trust and former Secretary General of the Department of Health addressed the conference as part of a panel on connected care. “eHealth properly utilised empowers patients, carers, the medical and associated professions, to work together to secure the very best outcomes for patients,” Dr McLoughlin has said. “eHealth also supports the implementation of cost-effective evidence-based best practice and enhances the clinical management of chronic disease such as heart failure.”

Dr McLoughlin also added that the Heartbeat Trust has been at the forefront of development of structured care programmes for the prevention and management of heart failure, including a “virtual consultation” service to enable specialists and GPs to discuss cases and reduce the need for outpatient department referral by 80%.

The conference was addressed by many global experts and advisors. Dr Alan Maisel, Professor of Medicine at the University of California gave the closing lecture on the future of eHealth and the role biomarkers can play in future health prediction through the use of the latest technologies. Professor Josip Car of Imperial College London and who has worked with the World Health Organisation also addressed the conference on the potential of eHealth. He believes healthcare is seriously lagging behind other sectors in terms of its use of information and communication technologies. His team are developing a technology to allow women who suffer depression post-pregnancy to be identified and treated.

The conference was also addressed by Richard Corbridge, Chief Information Officer of the Health Service Executive, Dr Nikolas Mastellos, Global eHealth Unit, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, Siobhan O’Connor of the University of Manchester, Paul Grundy, Global Director of Healthcare Transformation at IBM, Karl O’Leary of Microsoft and Dr Eugenio Capasso of Menarini Foundation.

The Heartbeat Trust are delighted with the success of eHealth in Revolution and look forward to the future and advancement of eHealth in Digital Health in Ireland and abroad.

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A brand new Heart Failure Patient Toolkit, specially developed for people with heart failure and their families, is brought to you by the Heart Failure Patient Alliance – a partnership between The Heartbeat Trust (the national Heart Failure charity) and Croí, the heart and stroke charity  (the West of Ireland Cardiac Foundation) which aims to increase awareness of Heart Failure and provide a voice for those living with the condition.

In this Toolkit you will find:

Practical advice on living with Heart Failure.

Tips on improving your health and wellbeing with healthy lifestyle changes like being active and eating well.

Videos featuring advice from Irish people living with Heart Failure as well as a range of health care professionals such as a cardiologist, a GP, a dietitian, a heart failure nurse specialist and more.

Quizzes and patient case studies to strengthen your knowledge and understanding. To access the toolkit please click here.

Creation of this Toolkit was sponsored by Novartis.

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eHealth in  Revolution Conference, Dublin Castle 15th-17th September

A major conference bringing together renowned speakers in healthcare and technology was held in Dublin Castle from the 15th-17th September. The conference was organised by the The Menarini Foundation and The Heartbeat Trust, a national charity that supports specialist clinical and research services in Heart Failure & Heart Failure Prevention and promotes efficiency in Irish healthcare especially around heart failure.

The eHealth in Revolution conference was officially opened by Minister for Health Simon Harris TD and over 250 local and international delegates attended this three-day event.

Speaking at the opening, Minister Harris said: “I want to recognise the importance of eHealth in delivery of patient care.  It has the potential to place the patient at the heart of our health system, and that’s something I’m very keen to see.  In particular, it can allow health professionals to provide care in the most appropriate setting.  New technologies are allowing for different approaches to the treatment of patients, offering alternative models of integrated care that can contribute to better outcomes for patients.  Modern technology and eHealth provides opportunities and facilities that enable patients to truly participate in and contribute to the management of their own health.”

Prof Ken McDonald, Consultant Cardiologist and Medical Director of The Heartbeat Trust, said: “This meeting presents an excellent opportunity to hear the latest information on many of the critical aspects of eHealth, along with insights into home-grown applications of this form of healthcare delivery.  IT has the capacity to revolutionise healthcare delivery in Ireland.  It is unfathomable why we haven’t made more progress with implementing technologies in healthcare but this conference offers a reflection point and an opportunity to spark a rising for eHealth.”

Dr Ambrose McLoughlin, Chairman of the Heartbeat Trust and former Secretary General of the Department of Health addressed the conference as part of a panel on connected care.  “eHealth properly utilised  empowers patients, carers, the medical and associated professions, to work together to secure the very best outcomes for patients,” Dr McLoughlin has said.  “eHealth also supports the implementation of cost-effective evidence-based best practice and enhances the clinical management of chronic disease such as heart failure.”

Dr McLoughlin also added that the Heartbeat Trust has been at the forefront of development of structured care programmes for the prevention and management of heart failure, including a “virtual consultation” service to enable specialists and GPs to discuss cases and reduce the need for outpatient department referral by 80%.

The conference was addressed by many global experts and advisors. Dr Alan Maisel, Professor of Medicine at the University of California gave the closing lecture on the future of eHealth and the role biomarkers can play in future health prediction through the use of the latest technologies.  Professor Josip Car of Imperial College London and who has worked with the World Health Organisation also addressed the conference on the potential of eHealth.  He believes healthcare is seriously lagging behind other sectors in terms of its use of information and communication technologies.  His team are developing a technology to allow women who suffer depression post-pregnancy to be identified and treated.

The conference was also addressed by Richard Corbridge, Chief Information Officer of the Health Service Executive, Dr Nikolas Mastellos, Global eHealth Unit, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, Siobhan O’Connor of the University of Manchester, Paul Grundy, Global Director of Healthcare Transformation at IBM, Karl O’Leary of Microsoft and Dr Eugenio Capasso of Menarini Foundation.

The Heartbeat Trust are delighted with the success of eHealth in Revolution and look forward to the future and advancement of eHealth in Digital Health in Ireland and abroad.

The Heartbeat Trust’s 6th Public Information Meeting took place in Fitzpatrick’s Killiney Castle Hotel, Wednesday, May 11th 2014. The meeting was attended by over 170 STOP-HF patients and carers.

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Professor Ken McDonald, Consultant Cardiologist and Medical Director of The Heartbeat Trust along with staff from the Trust presented an update on our groundbreaking STOP-HF heart failure prevention study and discussed how results from the study have helped shape the expanding heart failure prevention service. Presentations on ongoing research, medication adherence and clinical trials were also given by Alison Sheerin, Research Nurse and Dr Fiona Ryan, Clinical Pharmacist. The Trust’s latest recruit Dr Conor Kerley, Dietician delivered tips on nutrition and exercise in heart disease prevention.

A Q&A session took place following the presentations where the audience asked our team of healthcare professionals a variety of questions on heart health from family history, medications and diet.

Patient feedback was tremendous and everyone complimented the staff for their delivery of a most informative and people friendly presentation. The question and answer session was excellent.  With one patient saying “It is indeed so very reassuring to know that we have excellent doctors such as Prof McDonald and his team working on our behalf.’” These public meetings help open a dialogue and promote the exchange of information between our community and their health care providers within the Heartbeat Trust.

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Approximately 1 in 5 people in Ireland are at risk developing heart failure, this group are the focus of the STOP HF (screening to prevent heart failure) programme run by the Heartbeat Trust. STOP HF began as a research programme in 2004 looking to see if people with risk factors for heart failure can have their risk defined by the use of a blood test known as Natriuretic Peptide (NP). NP is a protein that is released from the heart when it is under stress or strain.

People with risk factors for developing heart failure and in particular those with high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes and a prior heart attack have participated in the programme. So far almost 3,000 people have been enrolled. The programme has recently expanded form the East Coast region into the Midlands region.

Prof McDonald, Medical Director of the Heartbeat Trust said “This important programme is a unique effort internationally and will provide important information on how best to prevent the development of heart failure. Remembering ‘prevention is better than the cure’ through early detection of risk the mortality and quality of life for the general population can be improved and in turn there can only but be a reduction in the economic burden on the health service.”

If you would like to hear more about the service or our ongoing research studies please contact Lisa at 083 4656098 or email lisa@heartbeat-trust.org.

Prof Ken McDonald, Dr Ambrose McLoughlin, Neil Johnson and Pat Spillane at the launch of the HFPA, Dublin

Prof Ken McDonald, Dr Ambrose McLoughlin, Neil Johnson and Pat Spillane at the launch of the HFPA, Dublin

The Heartbeat Trust and West of Ireland Heart and Stroke Charity, Croí, supported by Novartis, have partnered to develop the HFPA

The HFPA was officially launched in Dublin by former GAA footballer Pat Spillane

It is the first initiative of its kind to support the day-to-day management of Heart Failure for patients

It aims to enable discussion of patient needs and represent patient needs in development of healthcare policy

The Heart Failure Patient Alliance (HFPA) was officially launched last week in Dublin by former GAA footballer, Pat Spillane, at an event attended by more than 160 heart failure patients, their carers and clinicians. The HFPA is the first initiative of its kind and aims to build a patient forum to address the lack of heart failure resources for patients. It is spearheaded by charities the Heartbeat Trust in collaboration with Croí, and is supported by multinational pharmaceutical company, Novartis. A comprehensive educational pack for patients and carers was also launched at the meeting.

Heart Failure Patient Educational Resource launched at the meeting

Heart Failure Patient Educational Resource launched at the meeting

Heart failure is one of the most prevalent chronic illnesses in the western world, being the predominant condition of all chronic diseases. As a consequence of an ageing population heart failure is set to dramatically increase over the next number of years, which is why it is important now more than ever, that we plan for the future to improve care for heart failure patients and their carers. It is fundamentally important to include people living with heart failure and their carers in this process.

The HFPA’s main goals are to facilitate discussion of patient needs in order to help manage their day-to-day existence with heart failure; to represent patient needs in developments of healthcare policy and initiatives in heart failure in Ireland; to interact with international heart failure patient forums on areas of mutual interest and importance and to encourage development of local self-care groups to help patients and carers to manage more day-to-day issues in their illness.

Speakers on the day included Professor Ken McDonald, Consultant Cardiologist, Medical Director, The Heartbeat Trust and the National Clinical Lead for Heart Failure; Karen Craddock, Physiotherapist, who delivered talks entitled ‘What is Heart Failure?’ and ‘Keeping active with Heart Failure’ respectively. Bronagh Travers, Heart Failure Specialist Nurse, The Heartbeat Trust, spoke on ‘Heart Failure signs, symptoms and self-care’.

Pat Spillane opens the launch of the HFPA

Pat Spillane opens the launch of the HFPA

Symptoms include severe breathlessness, fatigue from everyday activities including climbing stairs and walking to the shops; sudden weight gain, for example two to three kilograms in a couple of days; swollen ankles and fluid build-up in the lungs and around the body. Alarmingly approximately one in three people mistake heart failure symptoms as normal signs of ageing.

Prof Ken McDonald, Medical Director of the Heartbeat Trust, said, “Heart Failure is a chronic illness affecting more than 90,000 people in Ireland. As one of the most prevalent chronic illnesses in the western world, it is astounding that management of the disease is so lacking when it comes to provision of a platform to enable discussion from the patient’s perspective.

“The HFPA will respond to the patient’s needs, and will both drive and support patient involvement at an individual level and at a group level. The Heartbeat Trust and Croí intend that the HFPA resolves the often poor management of this condition and improves resources for heart failure patients in communities throughout the country.”

Neil Johnson, CEO, Croí said, “We are delighted to partner with the Heartbeat Trust to give a voice to those living with heart failure in Ireland. We know that the burden of heart failure could be significantly reduced through earlier diagnosis and better access to diagnostics.

“Now that we are officially launched, the Heart Failure Patient Alliance will advocate for greater awareness of the signs and symptoms of heart failure as well as better care pathways so that people living with heart failure and their carers can enjoy a better quality of life.”

Dr Ambrose McLoughlin, Chairman, The Heartbeat Trust said, “It is extremely important that we mobilise the patient voice to improve the healthcare needs of people living with heart failure. Our hope and intention is to develop the HFPA into a nationwide organisation, potentially involving other cardiovascular organisations, in order to best ensure early diagnosis and to lessen the burden of Heart Failure on the patient and on the healthcare system.”

Loretto Callaghan, Managing Director, Novartis Ireland said, “For many patients and their families in Ireland, being diagnosed with Heart Failure is frightening and upsetting. We know that patients who receive good heart failure education and support are empowered and informed enough to manage the condition effectively.

“Novartis is glad to support the HFPA and bring awareness and attention to this chronic illness which impacts tens of thousands nationwide.”

About the Heart Failure Patient Alliance

The HFPA is a patient forum to support the management of chronic illness requires active patient involvement, both at the level of the individual patient as well as at group level, the latter to ensure that the views and needs of the patients and their families are heard and acted on. As one of the most prevalent chronic illnesses in the western world, management of heart failure has only addressed patient involvement on an individual case level, and has not to date developed a patient forum to enable discussion of the patients’ perspective. The Heart Failure Patient Alliance is designed to address this deficiency.

About the Heartbeat Trust
The Heartbeat Trust is a charity established in 2004 by Prof Ken McDonald and Dr Mark Ledwidge to support specialist clinical and research services in heart failure and heart failure prevention in Ireland. The Heartbeat Trust’s services are based in St Vincent’s Hospital, St Michael’s Hospital, Dun Laoghaire and The Conway Institute, UCD.

About Croí
Croí is a not-for-profit foundation established in 1985 as a limited company dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke in the region. We are an independent organisation, totally funded through our own fundraising activities, voluntary contributions and philanthropic support.

Heart Failure Educational Aids

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HFPA LaunchA new initiative aimed at improving the healthcare needs of people living with heart failure is due to be launched later this week.

Heart failure is a potentially life-threatening condition which leads to the heart being unable to pump enough blood around the body. Symptoms include tiredness, shortness of breath, dizziness and swollen ankles and around 90,000 people are currently living with the condition in Ireland.

The Heart Failure Patient Alliance (HFPA) is a joint initiative of the heart failure charity, the Heartbeat Trust, and the heart and stroke charity, Croí. The Heartbeat Trust plan to work with Croí to improve the healthcare needs of people living with this condition and their carers.

image001The HFPA will be officially launched on April 15 in the Talbot Hotel in Stillorgan in Dublin at 1.30pm, while a second meeting will take place in the Galway Bay Hotel on April 16 at 10am. These launch meetings are open to anyone living with heart failure, as well as the families and carers of people with the condition.

Speakers will include healthcare professionals who are experts in this area, including consultant cardiologist and clinical director of the Heartbeat Trust, Prof Ken McDonald, and Dr Pat Nash, a consultant cardiologist at Galway University Hospital.

For a full agenda please click here.

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New Research Shows The Cost Of Heart Failure To Irish Society Totals €660m HeartFailure info (web)HeartFailure info

New research conducted by the Heartbeat Trust in collaboration with the Irish Heart Foundation, the National University of Ireland Galway (NUIG) and supported by Novartis has found that the total cost of heart failure from a societal perspective is €660 million and is likely to increase in the future.  This is an original piece of research and is the first to look at the cost of heart failure to Irish society.

Professor Kenneth McDonald, Medical Director of The Heartbeat Trust, Consultant Cardiologist and Clinical Lead for the HSE Heart Failure Clinical Care Programme, said, “Never before has the national cost of heart failure in primary or community care been assessed. This important piece of research shows the extent of the burden of heart failure throughout primary and secondary health care settings in Ireland.

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HEALTH LEADERS TO MEET TO DISCUSS TECHNOLOGY IN HEALTHCARE

20/10/2015 NO REPRO FEE, MAXWELLS DUBLIN Pic shows: (l to r) Research and Development Director of the Heartbeat Trust: Doctor Mark Ledwidge, Medical Director of the Heartbeat Trust: Professor Ken McDonald and Dr Ambrose McLoughlin, former Secretary General of the Department of Health and Chairperson of the Heartbeat Trust at the meeting in Dublin today. Some of the leading forces in healthcare, including senior officials of the Department of Health and HSE, will meet tomorrow (Tuesday) to discuss how the health service could be re-designed to make wider use of technologies in the treatment of chronic diseases. The meeting is being convened by the Heartbeat Trust which uses technology to manage heart failure patients.  Chaired by Dr Ambrose McLoughlin, former Secretary General of the Department of Health, the Trust is bringing together the top 25 in healthcare in Ireland involving Government, medics, HSE, CEOs of pharma, insurance, medical devices, tech companies about redesigning the health service. The Trust lead by a consultant cardiologist in St Vincent’s, Professor Ken McDonald could be a model for tackling chronic diseases which eat up a lot of the health service’s resources.  Using technology the Trust keeps people prone to heart failure out of hospital as much as possible.  “If the health system went for a system of connected care on chronic diseases involving service providers, funders, GPs, e-health, pharma and med tech, then it would take pressures out of the system and make better use of resources,” according to Dr McLoughlin, Chairman of the Heartbeat Trust. The Trust initiative is based on deploying smart community-based diagnostics to broaden the range of people who can benefit from landmark Screening to Prevent Heart Failure (STOP-HF) programme.  It also brings the next generation of novel, specific and personalised therapies to the STOP-HF population, as well as delivering care in the community using eHealth initiatives such as telemonit

Dublin, Monday, October 19, 2015: Some of the leading forces in healthcare, including senior officials of the Department of Health and HSE, will meet tomorrow (Tuesday) to discuss how the health service could be re-designed to make wider use of technologies in the treatment of chronic diseases.

 

The meeting is being convened by the Heartbeat Trust which uses technology to manage heart failure patients.  Chaired by Dr Ambrose McLoughlin, former Secretary General of the Department of Health, the Trust is bringing together the top 25 in healthcare in Ireland involving Government, medics, HSE, CEOs of pharma, insurance, medical devices, tech companies about redesigning the health service.

 

The Trust lead by a consultant cardiologist in St Vincent’s, Professor Ken McDonald could be a model for tackling chronic diseases which eat up a lot of the health service’s resources.  Using technology the Trust keeps people prone to heart failure out of hospital as much as possible.  “If the health system went for a system of connected care on chronic diseases involving service providers, funders, GPs, e-health, pharma and med tech, then it would take pressures out of the system and make better use of resources,” according to Dr McLoughlin, Chairman of the Heartbeat Trust.

 

The Trust initiative is based on deploying smart community-based diagnostics to broaden the range of people who can benefit from landmark Screening to Prevent Heart Failure (STOP-HF) programme.  It also brings the next generation of novel, specific and personalised therapies to the STOP-HF population, as well as delivering care in the community using eHealth initiatives such as telemonitoring and Virtual Consultations between primary and secondary care physicians.  This reduces waiting lists and bring care closer to the patient by empowering primary care.

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The pioneering work has shown a 40% reduction in heart-related Emergency Department admissions for the patients involved to date.  More than one million people in Ireland fit the STOP-HF criteria and amongst those, the model could save more than 17,000 emergency department admissions annually, equivalent to creating a brand new 380-bed hospital, if the model were rolled out nationally.  “People are now looking to our group internationally to understand how to roll the model out.  For example groups in Germany and Austria are working on the STOP-HF model and the Mayo Clinic in the United States is continuing discussions on how to adapt the STOP-HF model to the US healthcare system,” Professor McDonald said.