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On the 15th June, The Heartbeat Trust held their first virtual STOPHF Patient information webcast. This education session was hosted live via YouTube and number of GP’s/patients nationwide were invited to view the webcast from the comfort of their own home/office.

Professor Ken McDonald, Consultant Cardiologist and Medical Director of the Heartbeat Trust along with Dr Mark Wilkinson presented an update on our ground-breaking STOPHF heart failure prevention study and discussed how results from the study have helped shape the expanding heart failure prevention service. Dr Mark Wilkinson, a registrar with the Trust gave an informative talk on how the heart works and what happens to your heart in heart failure. He also gave some excellent tips on making heart healthy lifestyle choices.

The trust received some extremely positive feedback from patients and healthcare professionals alike.  “Thank you all for an excellent presentation. So informative and easy to watch. I have not been able to attend previous meetings due to work commitments so, this evenings arrangements were great for me”. (STOPHF Patient)

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This was the first virtual patient focused educational webcast by the Trust and is potentially the innovative solution required to enhance patient engagement (the wonder drug of the 21st century). The Heartbeat Trust aim to produce a number of these webcasts as a means of offering a virtual solution to STOPHF patient education.

Guests were invited to simply click on the link to visit The Heartbeat Trust YouTube channel at the specified time and date. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAfEwrJ0aarrrQ_nSjXF25Q

This education webcast was recorded and is available to watch now on YouTube.

Please SUBSCRIBE to our channel to stay updated on future meetings.

Good for the Heart; The Heartbeat of Bloom

On Thursday 1st June, The Heartbeat Trust launched their ‘Good for the Heart’ garden at Bloom by Bord Bia, to the garden visitors and a host of VIP guests. The Garden titled ‘Good for the Heart’ was awarded Highly Commended by the Bloom Judges.

Pictured at the launch was President Michael D. Higgins and the President’s Wife Sabina Higgins, Micheál Martin (Fianna Fáil leader), Tony Ward (Former Irish Rugby Legend and an active supporter of the Trust) and Dr. Ambrose Mcloughlin (Heartbeat Trust Chairman) and our wonderful volunteers.

As one of The Heartbeat Trusts main focus areas is STOP-HF and the prevention of heart failure, the garden encompasses that message. ‘Good for the Heart’ is a Heart Healthy garden, rich in healthy vegetables and fruit to increase awareness and help in the fight against heart failure. The garden has fruit and veg areas representing the need for healthy diet, highlighting healthy foods that aid in heart health.

Bird feeders with various seeds and nuts represent the importance of lowering cholesterol. Hanging from our apple tree are wooden hearts made by our volunteers which represent the hearts saved by STOP-HF. In the garden is a moss covered chair ornate with blooming flowers to represent life and a bicycle to represent the importance of exercise and fitness.

‘Good for the Heart’ received a lot of positive feedback from the visitors which is not surprising as 1 in 5 people will be affected by heart failure. The garden really hit a chord with people and the messages within the garden were well received.
“Good for the Heart’ is a Heart Healthy garden, rich in healthy vegetables and fruit to increase awareness and help in the fight against heart failure. Heart failure can largely be avoided and with the correct supports can be significantly reduced. We all need to be heart aware and stay heart healthy!” Sinead Hand, Communications Officer, Heartbeat Trust.

Sinéad Hand designed the ‘Good for the Heart’ garden on behalf of the charity and a small but amazing team of volunteers helped create the suburb garden.
Mary Proctor from Lissenhall Nurseries is part of the small team behind Good for the Heart. She has expert knowledge of horticulture and has given incredible guidance with putting the garden together. Lissenhall Nurseries offer a full range of outdoor products, including fruit trees, plants and hedging.

The Heartbeat Trust would like to thank all our garden volunteers for their hard work. Without their support our ‘Good for the Heart’ garden would never have bloomed into fruition. Special thank you to Francis Hand, Nicholas Codd, Gus Keane, Adrienne O’ Connell Flood, Maura Quirke and Dolores Hand.

Tullys Nurseries are one of the main sponsors of the garden. They have given fantastic support to The Heartbeat Trust and supplied planting material for our postcard garden in Bloom.

The garden has been sponsored by a number of suppliers including Lissenhall Nurseries, Tullys Nurseries, Dunshane Nursery, Carl Foran Photography,  Green Worx, Bord na mona and Cuprinol.

The Heartbeat Trust would like to extend their thanks to everyone who has contributed to the garden.

The Heartbeat Trust Launch Education Programme for Secondary Schools

The Heartbeat Trust are proud to announce the launch an education outreach programme aimed at secondary level students. The aim of the education sessions are to encourage teenagers to be proactive and take control of their lifestyle and make heart healthy choices which aid in the prevention of heart failure.

Heart failure is often seen as an ‘old age’ issue however it is becoming more prominent in Irish society. Heart failure can largely be avoided and with the correct aids can be significantly reduced. We all need to be heart aware and stay heart healthy!

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The Education Programme was launched with students from St Tiernan’s Community School, Balally on  April 26th 2017.  Dr. Mark Wilkinson and Ms. Sinead Hand (from The Heartbeat Trust) presented to the students on the Science of Heart Failure followed by an interactive session.

The students were extremely enthusiastic about the education session and The Heartbeat Trust were delighted with the positive feedback.

“We are very excited about the launch of the Heartbeat Trust Educational Programme which ties in nicely with the Trust’s motto of Predict, Protect, Prevent. With this new initiative we aim to educate the younger generation in ways they can be proactive about their own health. We are delighted to be able to engage with the students and encourage them to make healthier lifestyle choices.” Sinead Hand, Communications Officer and School Liaison Coordinator.

The outreach programme run by the Heartbeat Trust charity aims to inspire teenagers to live healthier lives and guide them in their health education. The talks are free of charge and available to secondary school students. If you are interested in having the team visit your school in the next academic year please contact info@heartbeat-trust.org

About The Heartbeat Trust

The Heartbeat Trust, is Ireland’s national heart failure charity, established in 2004 by Prof Ken McDonald and Dr Mark Ledwidge to support specialist clinical and research services in heart failure and heart failure prevention. Patient services are provided in St Michael’s and St Vincent’s Hospitals. St Michael’s Hospital, Dun Laoghaire  is also home to the STOP-HF initiative – which offers screening to prevent heart failure, a service aimed at prevention and early detection.

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The STOPHF screening initiative is where individuals (over 40 years of age who have one cardiovascular risk factor such as high blood pressure or diabetes) have a simple blood test which can predict those at risk of not just heart failure but other cardiovascular diseases, allowing more focused care to be directed to these at individuals.  The programme began in 2004 as a research project with the main aim of assessing if people with risk factors for heart failure could have their risk defined by the use of a blood test known as Natriuretic Peptide (NP). NP is a protein that is released from the heart when it is under stress or strain.

Special thank you to all the students and staff at St Tiernan’s Community School, Balally.

Creative Panda for sponsoring our bookmarks.

Natasha’s Living Foods for sponsoring some delicious (healthy) treats!

STOPHF (Screening to Prevent Heart Failure) Information video Launch on European Heart Failure Awareness Day

On May 5th, European Heart Failure Awareness Day, The Heartbeat Trust are proud to launch the STOPHF (Screening to Prevent Heart Failure) information video. The video was created in order to demonstrate to the wider community that STOPHF is a simple blood test with incredible results.

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Nurse and patient STOPHF NP blood test

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The STOPHF screening initiative is where individuals (over 40 years of age who have one cardiovascular risk factor such as high blood pressure or diabetes) have a simple blood test which can predict those at risk of not just heart failure but other cardiovascular diseases, allowing more focused care to be directed to these at individuals.  The STOPHF programme began in 2004 as a research project with the main aim of assessing if people with risk factors for heart failure could have their risk defined by the use of a blood test known as Natriuretic Peptide (NP). NP is a protein that is released from the heart when it is under stress or strain.

The information video was created by a wonderful team of volunteers and The Heartbeat Trust  would like to thank Mrs. Dolores Hand (actress) and Mr. Cian Brennan (videographer) for their contributions.

About The Heartbeat Trust

The Heartbeat Trust, is Ireland’s national heart failure charity, established in 2004 by Prof Ken McDonald and Dr Mark Ledwidge to support specialist clinical and research services in heart failure and heart failure prevention. Patient services are provided in St Michael’s and St Vincent’s Hospitals. St Michael’s Hospital, Dun Laoghaire  is also home to the STOP-HF initiative – which offers screening to prevent heart failure, a service aimed at prevention and early detection.

Heart Failure the Facts

Did you know…? Heart Failure affects approximately 90,000 people in Ireland, costing upwards of €700 million. One in five of us will develop heart failure in our lifetimes. These figures are staggering and more is needed to help prevent this silent killer.

STOPHF Video links

Vimeo – https://vimeo.com/210938511

Youtube – https://youtu.be/lHHS6HAG_WI

Heart Failure Virtual Clinics

One in 5 of us will develop heart failure in our lifetime. There are up to 90,000 people in Ireland living with Heart Failure and the estimated cost of Heart Failure is €660 million.

Heart Failure, with the correct supports can largely be managed in the community. That’s where the Heartbeat Trust steps in with its innovative approach to health care management.

The Heartbeat Trust has been at the forefront of development of structured care programmes for the prevention and management of heart failure, including a “virtual consultation” service to enable specialists and GPs to discuss cases and reduce the need for outpatient department referral by 80%.

The Heart Failure Virtual Clinics (HFVC) are used to disseminate expert advice and education to GPs. Using a web conference platform GPs can log in remotely, following presentation of a short CME topic GPs can discuss their cases with Prof Ken McDonald, Consultant Cardiologist and Medical Director of the Heartbeat Trust, Dr Patricia Campbell, Consultant Cardiologist and their specialist team. The HFVCs provide online, real-time conversations between the GP and specialist allowing speedy focused interactions

The trust has developed an info-graphic highlighting the key benefits of the HFVC and includes a number of excellent quotes from GPs across the country.

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For GPs, the HFVC provides a dynamic learning environment, improved knowledge base, peer to peer support and most importantly the necessary supports to maintain and treat heart failure patients in the primary care setting.

By managing heart failure in the community, the HFVC removes a step in the traditional care pathway facilitating interaction between the specialist/GP. The HFVC care pathway is cost efficient and creates a dynamic, collaborative communication environment compared to the traditional referral letter pathway. This in turn reduces costs and the need for patient travel and family inconvenience.  Moreover, the HFVC reduces the need for Out Patient Department (OPD) referrals which frees up hospital OPD slots for those in need of standard clinics resulting in shorter waiting times and speedier reviews.

The Heartbeat Trust are passionate about the future advancement of eHealth in Ireland and are optimistic about the use of technology for wider dissemination of heart failure knowledge and community care.

How It Works.

The Heart Failure Virtual Clinic is service that has been successfully running for twenty-four months.  These virtual consultations are held bi-weekly from the Heartbeat Trust head office and are currently on Tuesdays and Fridays at 1pm., having recently expanded into the Carlow Kilkenny region through support from the HSE.

CME topics include (but are not limited to), Diagnosis of Heart Failure, Management of Stable Heart Failure, Troubleshooting medications in heart failure and other similar topics. Following the CME topic up to six cases are discussed which results in an intense hour of impartation of knowledge.

Patient referrals are accepted through email/FAX and Healthlink, via the Heart Failure Virtual Clinic Referral tab.

Presently, there are 150 GPs signed up to date across the East Coast, Midlands and now Carlow Kilkenny region with 100% of GPs agreeing that the HFVC advice was useful in treating their patients and that the patients themselves benefited as a result of their participation in the HFVC. The patients themselves were also happy to have their conditions discussed with expert and groups of GPs and relieved to not be referred to the OPD.

The Heartbeat Trust provide full training for first time users or those that require a refresher.

If you would like further information or to sign up to the HFVC please contact Lisa McCudden on 0877474436 or lisa@heartbeat-trust.org

 

Plain English Awards for Ireland

The winners of the Plain English Awards for Ireland, sponsored by Mason Hayes & Curran, were announced by the National Adult Literacy Agency in Dublin on the 9th February 2017.

The independent judges were very impressed with how all the winners communicated directly to the intended reader through language that was easy to read and understand. The Heartbeat Trust are thrilled with the recognition of their continued effort in raising public awareness of heart failure and are delighted with their winning entry in the Health Posters & Bookmarks category. The organisers felt that the poster highlights in a clear and understandable manner, the main symptoms of heart failure.Nala Awards Website

The poster was designed by Dr Ciara Keane, Project Manager of the Heartbeat Trust after realising that clear, concise information was needed to help in the fight against heart failure and prevention of heart failure. Recognising the main symptoms of heart failure is vital in diagnoses and a key factor in raising public awareness. With this in mind, Dr Keane set about communicating these symptoms through visual design and the result was our winning entry.

The Winning Poster:Poster main symptoms heart failure = Shortness of breath Swollen ankles legs Sudden weight gain Palpitations Poor Appetite Tiredenss.

The Plain English Awards are organised by the National Adult Literacy Agency and sponsored by leading law firm Mason Hayes & Curran. The Awards were presented at a Gala Dinner in the Law Society of Ireland, Dublin.

Speaking about the awards, Inez Bailey, CEO, National Adult Literacy Agency said: “We developed these awards as we want to create a public preference for organisations that choose to communicate in plain English. We were delighted to get so many entries from organisations around the country as everyone benefits from clear information, written in plain English. We would like to congratulate EirGrid, Director of Public Prosecutions, Down Syndrome Ireland, Pavee Point and the Marie Keating Foundation, The Heartbeat Trust, Bord Gais, the Irish Lung Fibrosis Association and Taxback.com.  They have won this award for thinking of the people who use their service and putting them first.”

Commenting on the sponsorship, Declan Black, Managing Partner at Mason Hayes & Curran said: “As a law firm we are delighted to be promoting the use of plain English rather than legal gobbledegook! Our approach at Mason Hayes & Curran is to ensure that our legal advice is always clear and accurate, particularly when complex issues are being explained. The use of plain English is aligned with that approach.  We hope that our support of this award contributes to the use of plain language in everyday communications and we congratulate the winners on a job well done.”

Plain English is a style of presenting information that helps you understand it the first time you read or see it. It involves short clear sentences, and using everyday words and imagery. It is particularly important to provide information in plain English for people with literacy difficulties.

The Heartbeat Trust are delighted with the award and hope to continue creating public information with NALA guidelines in mind. They have recently developed the Heart Failure Education Pack and Toolkit which has also been approved by NALA.

The education pack can be found here.

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Barometer Info Graphic

Heart Failure Community Calls on Government to Prioritise ‘Forgotten’ Illness Which Will Affect 1 in 5 People in Ireland 

New report finds treatment of Heart Failure is no longer a lost cause and recommends a framework to improve lives of 90,000 affected by heart failure.

Heart Failure is a serious, but forgotten, chronic condition which carries a huge cost of €660 million per year to Irish society.  Heart Failure is the leading cause of hospitalisations in Ireland yet just 7% of people in Ireland can identify symptoms of Heart Failure.

Pictured at the launch are L to R Minister Sean Kyne, TD, Dr. Ambrose McLoughlin, Chairman Heartbeat Trust and Kevin O’ Reilly Chairman Croi, Heart & Stroke Charity.

Click here to read full report.

Monday 21st November, 2016: The treatment of Heart Failure, a ‘forgotten’ chronic condition, is no longer a lost cause, according to the authors of a new report entitled ‘Heart Failure Country Barometer: Ireland’. The report outlines four key policy priorities and calls on the Government to implement this framework to improve the lives of 90,000 people affected by Heart Failure6.

Minister of State for Gaeltacht Affairs and Natural Resources, Sean Kyne, TD officially launched, and contributed to, the report which, most importantly, provides solutions to this major health challenge which costs the state €660 million per year1. Heart Failure, a serious and often debilitating chronic condition, has a worse prognosis than many of the most common forms of cancer and can lead to poor quality of life for those affected4.

Speaking at the launch meeting, Minister Sean Kyne, TD said, “For too long Heart Failure has been the forgotten condition in health policy in Ireland, despite its impact on patients’ lives and the economy. Today, we have outlined the current situation in Ireland and highlighted the unmet needs of both the medical and patient Heart Failure community. The burden of Heart Failure will only increase in years to come so we must make Heart Failure a truly national priority now, and implement the recommendations put forward in this Barometer report.”

The ‘Heart Failure Country Barometer: Ireland’ report, developed by Croí, the Heartbeat Trust, and supported by Novartis, with contributions from medical professionals, patients and advocacy experts, highlights four key policies to prioritise and recommends how to achieve them:

  • Make Heart Failure a national priority: Explicitly mention Heart Failure within existing chronic disease policies and ensure there are sufficient resources to implement the HSE’s National Clinical Programme for Heart Failure on a national level, with adequate funding for both GP and hospital care.

 

  • Prioritise speedy diagnosis and treatment: Ensure that patients with symptoms of Heart Failure are diagnosed as early as possible, without delay.

 

  • Ensure consistent and coordinated patient care: Create a coordinated, community-based national programme between the hospital and community care at general practice level to provide patients greater continuity of care and encourage patient self-management.

 

  • Increase awareness and understanding of Heart Failure: Support a national Heart Failure prevention programme by raising public awareness of the risk of developing Heart Failure and ensuring access to high quality information and support for both the public and the medical profession.

Commenting on the report, Professor Ken McDonald, Consultant Cardiologist and National Clinical Lead for Heart Failure said, “Chronic illness threatens to overrun our healthcare system. Heart Failure, as the most complex of these illnesses, can be used as a pilot to establish effective methods of managing chronic diseases, primarily in the community, with the support of hospital-based specialists, when needed. A large number of premature deaths still occur as a result of lack of knowledge of Heart Failure and its symptoms. Better recognition would prompt people to seek treatment at an earlier stage, leading to more accurate diagnosis, decreased risk of hospitalisations and improved survival rates. Most types of Heart Failure are preventable, patients who are treated early can significantly improve their outcome. The policy asks we are calling for will improve the prevention, treatment and management of Heart Failure in Ireland.”

Neil Johnson, Chief Executive, Croí said, “This report brings together medical expertise, patient insights, advocacy experience and economic data to create a framework for our Government to improve the lives of those affected by Heart Failure in Ireland. The burden that Heart Failure can have on patients’ lives, and the State, needs to be improved as Heart Failure treatment is no longer a lost cause. We know what we need to do to protect 90,000 hearts in Ireland, and the additional 10,000 newly diagnosed each year. Now we must do it.”

In Europe, 15 million people live with Heart Failure. Currently there is no EU-wide strategy supporting public awareness, prevention, diagnosis and management of Heart Failure. Strong leadership by European and national policy makers is essential to reduce the future burden of the condition. In October, a new Written Declaration on Heart Failure was launched in the European parliament, in partnership with patients, professionals and parliamentarians. Irish MEPs Mairead McGuinness and Nessa Childers are supporting the Written Declaration on Heart Failure.

For more information, and to read the full framework of policy priorities, visit http://www.heartbeat-trust.ie / www.croi.ie / www.novartis.ie

and follow us on Twitter and Facebook #heartfailure #changeHFpolicy.

 

World Heart Day

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For World Heart Day (29th September) The Heartbeat Trust team had a information stand in St. Vincent’s University Hospital and took photos of staff and patients holding their branded social media frame in an effort to raise awareness of heart health and heart failure prevention. These photos were then uploaded onto social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter, for fans to Like, Share and tag themselves in.

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To run alongside this event, the Heartbeat Trust ran a social media competition to assist in the growth of their online profile. The Happy Pear, kindly donated their cookbook ‘The World of the Happy Pear’ for a spot prize and the response was excellent.

Social media is an excellent way of driving communication and patient engagement which has become a key communication strategy for the Heartbeat Trust in promoting on-going fundraising activities and awareness campaigns.

An information meeting on the Screening to Prevent Heart Failure (STOP-HF) programme developed by Professor Kenneth McDonald, Consultant Cardiologist and Medical Director of the Heartbeat Trust was held in the Talbot Hotel, Stillorgan on the evening of Tuesday 11th October. The Heartbeat Trust, is a national charity that supports specialist clinical and research services in Heart Failure & Heart Failure Prevention by promoting efficiency in Irish healthcare especially around heart failure. Our motto is Predict, Protect, Prevent.

The Heartbeat Trust run a Screening initiative called STOP-HF (Screening to Prevent Heart Failure) in which individuals (over 40 years of age who have one cardiovascular risk factor, such as high blood pressure or diabetes) have a simple blood test which can predict those at risk of not just heart failure but other cardiovascular diseases, allowing more focused care to be directed to these at individuals.

The STOP-HF patient information meeting entitled, “Get More from STOP-HF; Equipping yourself with the knowledge to keep a Healthy Heart” was delivered by the expert team at The Heartbeat Trust. The speakers on the evening included Prof Ken McDonald, Consultant Cardiologist and Medical Director of the Heartbeat Trust, Fiona Ryan; Pharmacist, Elaine Tallon;STOP-HF Nurse and Karen Cradock; Specialist Cardiac Physiotherapist.

Over 300 guests attended this successful meeting and gained invaluable knowledge from these experts.

STOPHF Meeting

Pictured are attendees making a heart symbol with their hands in an effort to raise awareness of Heart Failure and Heart Failure Prevention.

Dr Ambrose McLoughlin, Chairman of the Heartbeat Trust and former Secretary General of the Department of Health, opened the meeting and welcomed over 300 guests.

Prof Ken McDonald gave the opening lecture on STOP-HF and the importance of BNP blood testing (BNP: B-type natriuretic peptide- which is a protein that is released from the heart muscle when it is under stress or strain) in preventing Heart Failure and the results to date. Ms Elaine Tallon, STOPHF Nurse followed with excellent advice on managing a balanced diet, cholesterol and blood pressure, followed by tips on exercise and how to reduce stress. With a phenomenal figure of 50% not taking medications as prescribed, Dr Fiona Ryan discussed the importance of medication adherence. She also explained clinical trials, how they work and the risks and benefits of participating.
The audience received an interactive presentation from Karen Cradock, Specialist Cardiac Physiotherapist, who (much to the guest’s amusement) had the audience out of their seats, doing gentle stretches and squats. Karen gave demonstrations of the types of exercise that should be undertaken on a daily basis in order to maintain a healthy heart.
The Heartbeat Trusts Communication Officer, Sinéad  Hand discussed the need for volunteers to get involved in the charity’s efforts in raising awareness of Heart Failure Prevention in Ireland. John, a Heartbeat Trust volunteer and STOPHF patient shared his experiences of the service and appealed to the guests to get involved with the charity in driving the future advancements of the STOPHF programme.

If you would like to get involved or find out any further information about The Heartbeat Trust, please get in touch by emailing us at info@heartbeat-trust.org

Read More→

 

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eHealth in Revolution
Dublin Castle 15th-17th September

A major conference bringing together renowned speakers in healthcare and technology was held in Dublin Castle from the 15th-17th September. The conference was organised by the The Menarini Foundation and The Heartbeat Trust, a national charity that supports specialist clinical and research services in Heart Failure & Heart Failure Prevention and promotes efficiency in Irish healthcare especially around heart failure.

The eHealth in Revolution conference was officially opened by Minister for Health Simon Harris TD and over 250 local and international delegates attended this three-day event.

Speaking at the opening, Minister Harris said: “I want to recognise the importance of eHealth in delivery of patient care. It has the potential to place the patient at the heart of our health system, and that’s something I’m very keen to see. In particular, it can allow health professionals to provide care in the most appropriate setting. New technologies are allowing for different approaches to the treatment of patients, offering alternative models of integrated care that can contribute to better outcomes for patients. Modern technology and eHealth provides opportunities and facilities that enable patients to truly participate in and contribute to the management of their own health.”

Prof Ken McDonald, Consultant Cardiologist and Medical Director of The Heartbeat Trust, said: “This meeting presents an excellent opportunity to hear the latest information on many of the critical aspects of eHealth, along with insights into home-grown applications of this form of healthcare delivery. IT has the capacity to revolutionise healthcare delivery in Ireland. It is unfathomable why we haven’t made more progress with implementing technologies in healthcare but this conference offers a reflection point and an opportunity to spark a rising for eHealth.”

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Dr Ambrose McLoughlin, Chairman of the Heartbeat Trust and former Secretary General of the Department of Health addressed the conference as part of a panel on connected care. “eHealth properly utilised empowers patients, carers, the medical and associated professions, to work together to secure the very best outcomes for patients,” Dr McLoughlin has said. “eHealth also supports the implementation of cost-effective evidence-based best practice and enhances the clinical management of chronic disease such as heart failure.”

Dr McLoughlin also added that the Heartbeat Trust has been at the forefront of development of structured care programmes for the prevention and management of heart failure, including a “virtual consultation” service to enable specialists and GPs to discuss cases and reduce the need for outpatient department referral by 80%.

The conference was addressed by many global experts and advisors. Dr Alan Maisel, Professor of Medicine at the University of California gave the closing lecture on the future of eHealth and the role biomarkers can play in future health prediction through the use of the latest technologies. Professor Josip Car of Imperial College London and who has worked with the World Health Organisation also addressed the conference on the potential of eHealth. He believes healthcare is seriously lagging behind other sectors in terms of its use of information and communication technologies. His team are developing a technology to allow women who suffer depression post-pregnancy to be identified and treated.

The conference was also addressed by Richard Corbridge, Chief Information Officer of the Health Service Executive, Dr Nikolas Mastellos, Global eHealth Unit, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, Siobhan O’Connor of the University of Manchester, Paul Grundy, Global Director of Healthcare Transformation at IBM, Karl O’Leary of Microsoft and Dr Eugenio Capasso of Menarini Foundation.

The Heartbeat Trust are delighted with the success of eHealth in Revolution and look forward to the future and advancement of eHealth in Digital Health in Ireland and abroad.